The Sequential History of How Tanglewood Came To Be – Part Six

The Sequential History of How Tanglewood Came To Be – Part Six

We stopped and rested over Sunday on the edge of this terrible swamp where milk sickness was prevalent. There was a family of 13 just close to where we camped over Sunday that all but three died with milk sickness. Cattle and Sheep also died with the same disease. People take it from drinking the milk and eating the butter. So we let the milk and butter alone. And knowing that the plague did not extend over into Iowa, we took courage. And after the Sunday rest we started anew for Iowa. Filled brimfull of the western fever. But oh what roads. How we did have to wallow through the Indiana mud. But hoping for something better we courageously tugged on. As we neared the western border of Indiana the roads still grew worse. But when we got into the state of Illinois we struck the grand prairie which was rather exciting to us as it was the first prairie that had seen. So we rather forgot about the mud for a little time. But the excitement began to dye down and the sad news came to us that at Peora one hundred miles ahead the cholera was raging. Yea that they were all dead. Not enough left to run the ferry boat. My mother being almost blind got somewhat discouraged, but Father never let discouragement ketch on. Traveling at the rate of about 16 miles per day, we finly arived at Poera finding the Illinois River all over the bottom everywhere. We had a dredful time getting on the ferry boat. The water being spread so wide over the bottom we had to drive about twenty rods into the water to get to the Ferry boat. We got three of our horses down and came very nearly drowning one of them. We worked west deep in the water for about two hours under the cruel cursing and daming of the boatmen to drive on. The cursing for about an hour and a half when one of the men plunged into the water waiding out to help us, but did not succeed so well as he thought for. But it stoped his multiplied oaths to drive on, drive on.

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